Baby Bear Sees Blue

Praise for Baby Bear Sees Blue…

Inspired by the mother bear and cub in Blueberries for Sal, Wolff creates a gentle story for toddlers that introduces colors and images from the natural world…. Wolff’s lovely compositions feature inked linoleum block prints that render those bears a strikingly deep, matte black. Lush, washy watercolors illuminate the scenes–colors in the downpour’s puddles reflect a rainbow. Curious Baby Bear is 100-percent toddler, and Wolff skillfully captures both the bear-ish…and the human…. Imbued with a spirit of exploration, fostered by parental protection, Baby Bear’s colorful adventures will enrich repeat bedtime read-alouds.
– Kirkus Reviews
Wolff’s (Compost Stew) watercolor-tinted linocuts make each page of this story simultaneously cozy and dramatic–cozy because they star a fuzzy bear cub and his mother, and dramatic because each one contrasts dark shapes with washes of light and color…. Children will be absorbed by the complex textures of Wolff’s linocuts, the Japanese woodblock–style graded shades of the sky, and the reassuring comfort of a world that is always safely guarded by Mama Bear.
As Baby Bear and his mother  amble through forest and meadow, the cub asks countless questions about his surroundings: “Who is warming me, Mama?,” “Who is waving to me, Mama?,” etc., and with each patient reply, “That is the sun” or “That is the oak,” Baby Bear notes the color of the object in question. The story comes full circle when mother and baby return to their cave and, closing his eyes, Baby Bear seeing nothing but “deep, soft black.” Luscious full-page linoleum print and watercolor illustrations delight with bright colors. Despite an abundance of books about bears and color concepts, this cozy story cleverly ties the two together. It would work well in storytimes or one on one.
– School Library Journal

Wolff’s illustrations, black linoleum-block prints washed with watercolors, feature bold lines, strong
compositions, and sensitive uses of color that will draw readers into the pictures. Excellent for group
sharing…. The quiet text is made up of Baby Bear’s questions about the sensory wonders of his world and his mother’s replies, and given a chance, young children will be happy to supply the answers first. An engaging concept book with just enough narrative for its audience.

~Booklist
The pacing of the book is perfectly suited to its young audience. With each new encounter Baby Bear’s question and Mama’s answer occur on one double-page spread while the next spread pauses to let Baby Bear (and readers) revel in the colors and in nature…. Wolff’s art–linoleum block prints hand-colored with watercolor–capture not only the glories of the natural world but also the loving relationship between parent and child. Satisfyingly, the book comes full circle, ending at bedtime: “‘Good night, Baby Bear,’ Mama says. ‘Good night, Mama,’ says Baby Bear. Then Baby Bear closes his eyes and sees nothing but deep, soft black.
~ The Horn Book
Featured in Meet The Illustrator in the March issue of BookPage.

Wolff’s watercolor-tinted linocuts make each page of this story simultaneously cozy and dramatic—cozy because they star a fuzzy bear cub and his mother, and dramatic because each one contrasts dark shapes with washes of light and color.”

~Publisher’s Weekly (starred review)

 

A Main Selection of 2012 Children’s Book of the Month Club

 

“Bright colors? Check. Detailed illustrations? Check. Cozy creatures? Check. Exploration of the world at the level of a toddler? Check! With picture-perfect questions and answers, we get to go along.”
~Tracy Gallagher, MLIS, Collection Development

 

Watch the book trailer here , and see the two orphaned cubs that inspired Ashley here.


Comments are closed.